Climate Change: Lesson plans/Activities

Learning Corner for 5-18 year olds by European Commission

If you’re a primary or secondary school pupil, this is where you’ll find games, competitions and activity books to help you discover the EU in a fun way, in the classroom or at home. You can also find out more about studying or volunteering abroad. If you’re a teacher and want to help your pupils learn about the EU and how it works, this is a source of teaching material for all age groups. As well as finding inspiration for lesson plans, you can also discover networking opportunities with other schools and teachers across the EU. You can find material about food, farming, fisheries, environment, climate, energy, culture and much more… NOTE:  This resource is available in various languages.  Links to the Maltese and English versions can be found below.   More direct links in attachments below too.

More

BEMED Educational Resource Pack – Clean Seas by Eco-Schools Malta

Plastic pollution is one of the greatest environmental disasters affecting the oceans. Once discarded into the natural environment, plastic can take up to 500 years to disappear. Every year, more than 8 million tons of plastic litter is thrown into the ocean. Drifting between waters, it can be ingested and can strangle or suffocate many animal species. Under the effect of the sun, it breaks into fragments called microplastics that can be ingested by fishes and enter the food-chain, which can have lasting impacts on human health.

More

BeMED 20. Tourism and its impact on the Environment

Title Tourism and its impact on the Environment Author Audrey Gauci Age Guide Year 10-11 Subject Area European Studies Preparation Time Research on the impact of tourists on the environment – especially in relation to marine litter. Preparation of interview / questionnaires to conduct an investigation in a touristic village Estimated Duration 40 mins – reporting skills 40 mins – creation of investigation 40 mins – evaluation and reporting of investigation Site Any touristic locality Educational objectives Develop one of the European Studies projects by investigating and reporting on tourism and its impact on marine litter. Project Titles –        The Impact of Tourism on the Environment Research, investigate and critically analyse themes: Protection of the Environment Candidates should be able to: – identify and understand the sources of air, land, water, noise and light pollution. – demonstrate some awareness of the possible environmental damage and solutions through the following case studies: the Mediterranean Sea and the Blue Plan. – identify and explain preventive measures to lessen their impact. – demonstrate an understanding of the extent to which modern farming practices, industry, tourism and transportation in Europe are responsible for environmental damage. Sustainable Development Candidates should be able to: – identify and understand the conflict of interest inherent between conservation and development in Europe, especially in the Mediterranean regions. Learning Outcomes Information management: – I can define the term sustainable development and its three pillars: economic, social, environmental. – I can analyse and explain the term biodiversity. I can discuss some of the threats it is experiencing, e.g. urbanisation, deforestation, over hunting/fishing. – Through examples I can identify and list conflicts of interest between economic development and environmental conservation. – I can discuss the concept of marine sustainability and pollution prevention giving examples drawn from the Mediterranean area, e.g. fisheries policy , Blue plan, Blue flags. – I can define and discuss the concept of Blue flag in terms of sustainable development of beaches and marinas. – I can analyse the benefits of having a sustainable fishing industry in the Mediterranean, drawing on examples of the bluefin tuna and swordfish. –  I am aware of which sources I can consult to learn more about the EU’s environment and fisheries policies. – I can actively participate in processes and encourage negotiations for alternative sustainable futures. – I will challenge unsustainable practices across educational systems, including at the institutional level. Link to SDGs SDG 4: Quality education for all SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Community SDG 13: Climate Change SDG 14: Life below water SDG 15: Life on land Educational resources required 1.     Video tutorials on reporting: https://www.yre.global/video-tutorials 2.     Interview guide: https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/how-conduct-journalistic-interview/ 3.     Case study on Sustainable tourism:- https://www.yre.global/international-collaboration-2/2020/9/23/sustainable-tourism-is-it-possible Remote preparation As part of their European Studies project work, student need to investigate and draw a report on one of 5 topics. One of the themes is Tourism and its impact on the Environment. Since both investigation and reporting are required, a session on appropriate reporting skills is carried out before the students actually go outside the school. Informative tutorials can be accessed online (Educational …

More

BeMED 18. Young journalists in action!

Title Young journalists in action! Author Audrey Gauci Age Guide Year 7-10 Subject Area English Language (but can be adapted to other languages) Preparation Time Preparation of interview / questionnaires to conduct an investigation in a coastal village/town. Estimated Duration 20 mins – reporting skills 20 mins – information session on marine litter 40 mins – discussion and creation of interview questions 40 mins – investigation outside school / online 40 mins – evaluation and reporting of investigation Site Any site related to the theme chosen – preferably a coastal area where marine litter is most prominent. Educational objectives –   Adhere to the requirements of the English syllabus in relation to report writing –   Learn how to investigate, be critical and assess comments and opinions expressed by others –   Express themselves in journalistic-style writing –   Work in teams Report Writing Report writing involves the production of a formal, informative and systematically presented text concerning a situation, person, place or plan. Report writing needs to evidence three clear characteristics: (a) adherence to the original request or brief; (b) a sustained perspective of who the report is supposedly being written by; and (c) an awareness of intended audience. Candidates should be able to: –    Select which type of report to write in response to a question. –    Employ a formal style of writing. –    State the purpose of the report in the introductory paragraph. –    Organise content by means of separate paragraphs clearly marked with subheadings. – Demonstrate an awareness of intended audience. Learning Outcomes Creative learning: –    I can participate in writing for a wide range of purposes and genres. Expressive language: – I can report, both in speech and in writing, what others have said or written. Managing learning – I can edit and revise my own writing. – I can write appropriately for an audience and with a purpose. – I can vary what I write according to the intended reader Learning to know: – I can justify the importance of identifying problems, reflecting critically, thinking creatively and having a wider vision in order to plan for the future and become an effective agent of change. Learning to do: –   I can use the natural, social and built environment that surrounds me, as a context and source of learning. Learning to be: –   I am a critically reflective person and am able to evaluate decisions, choices and actions. Learning to live together: –    I will challenge unsustainable practices across educational systems, including at the institutional level. Link to SDGs SDG 4: Quality education SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Community* SDG 13: Climate Change SDG 14: Life below water* SDG 15: Life on land* *depends on the theme students select Educational resources required Video tutorials on reporting, in particular to report writing: https://www.yre.global/video-tutorials Interview guide: https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/how-conduct-journalistic-interview/ Appendix 18.1 – Optional PowerPoint (Kindly send email on [email protected] if you wish to obtain this Powerpoint) Internet connection Remote preparation Since both investigation and reporting are required, a session on appropriate reporting skills is …

More

BeMED 17. Investigating the effects of marine litter on sea water temperature and pH level

Title Investigating the effects of marine litter on sea water temperature and pH level Author Ramona Mercieca Age Guide Year 7-8 Subject Area Geography, Integrated science Preparation Time 1 hour Estimated Duration Data collection 10 mins daily spread over 2 months Site School ground Educational objectives To develop fieldwork skills such as collecting and recording data To learn more about the effects of marine litter Learning Outcomes –     I can justify the importance of identifying problems, reflecting critically, thinking creatively and having a wider vision in order to plan for the future and become an effective agent of change. –     I can use the natural, social and built environment that surrounds me, as a context and source of learning. –     I am motivated to make a positive contribution to other people and their social and natural environment, locally and globally. –     I can reflect upon the consequences of my actions on present and future generations. Link to SDGs SDG 3: Good health and well-being SDG 4: Quality education SDG 11:  Sustainable cities and communities SDG 12:  Responsible consumption and production Educational resources required 2 big glass jars Sea water Plastic litter Digital pH reader Digital thermometer Data logger to measure air temperature, humidity and air pressure GLOBE Observer App to record cloud type and cover (optional) Appendix 17.1 – Data sheets Remote preparation Organize a beach clean-up event. Marine litter collected to be taken at school to be used in investigation. Collect sea water samples in a small jerry can. Planning Considerations Very important to focus on the FACTS, especially when researching and collecting data about the effects of marine litter. For beach clean-up event: ·      Healthy and Safety information (stay in groups, stay away from the sea and cliffs, hazard of roads and weather). ·      Brief outline of day and objectives for the day. Set up the day’s investigation aim and consider hypotheses.  Toilet stops and time for the lunch break. ·      Risk assessment/class list/medication/first aid kits Method Introduction In this activity students will investigate the effects of plastic litter on sea water temperature and sea water pH levels. Two large glass jars are filled with the same amount of sea water. In one of the jars the students put some plastic litter collected during the beach clean-up event done beforehand. The glass jars are to be placed outside exposed to the sun and rain. Development Every day students will take three readings of the sea  water temperature and pH level from  both jars and calculate the mean of the three samples. Moreover, the students will measure the air temperature, humidity and air pressure, describe the general outlook of the weather and observe cloud cover using the GLOBE Observer App (optional). Information collected is filled in the data sheets (Appendix 17.1). Conclusion  Once all data is collected students will present it in a graph and analyze it through mean values of repetitions (pH and temperature) by jar to both treatments (with plastics, without plastics).  The mean values are to be plotted along the …

More

BeMED 16. Outdoor Classroom Activity – Beach Fieldwork

Title Outdoor Classroom Activity – Beach Fieldwork Author Ramona Mercieca Age Guide Year 7 Subject Area Geography Preparation Time 1 hour Estimated Duration 4 hours Site Coastal Area Educational objectives To further students’ map reading skills. To develop fieldwork skills such as collecting and recording data. To learn more about their local area and describe how litter make them feel. Learning Outcomes – I can use the basic mapping skills which include a scale, a legend and compass points to plan journeys, latitudes and longitudes to locate places. – I can use appropriate sources to observe and record local weather. – I can justify the importance of identifying problems, reflecting critically, thinking creatively and having a wider vision in order to plan for the future and become an effective agent of change. – I can use the natural, social and built environment that surrounds me, as a context and source of learning. – I am motivated to make a positive contribution to other people and their social and natural environment, locally and globally. – I can reflect upon the consequences of my actions on present and future generations. Link to SDGs SDG 3: Good health and well-being SDG 4: Quality education for all SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production Educational resources required A4 map of beach site x1 (per group) Appendix 16.1 – Group Recording Sheets X5 (per group) Appendix 16.2 – Litter Survey Sheet x1 (per group) Pencils Clipboards Digital cameras Data logger Thermometer Digital pH reader GLOBE Observer App – optional Small container X1 (per group) Remote preparation Teacher needs to prepare the resources as indicated in the previous section. The outdoor classroom activity will be an opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills learned during geography lessons like using a map, observing and recording the weather, locating beach site using the coordinates. Before the outdoor classroom activity the students will do research about marine litter – its sources and effects on the marine environment. Planning Considerations It is very important to focus on the FACTS, especially when researching and collecting data re marine litter. Healthy and Safety information (stay in groups, stay away from the sea and cliffs, hazard of roads and weather). Brief outline of the day and objectives for the day. Set up the day’s investigation aim and consider hypotheses. Toilet stops and time for the lunch break. Risk assessment/class list/medication/first aid kits. Method Activity Outline: Half the day is spent at the beach collecting field data on weather, sea water temperature, sea water pH level and doing a litter survey. Introduction Introduce site and locate it on the map of the Maltese Islands. Briefly introduce the history of the area (fishing and tourism and coastal erosion). The students will be split in groups and each group will select a leader and is given a pack with the group’s recording sheets and a small container. Development Students explore and investigate the beach site by answering the questions on the …

More

Mediterranean Environmental Learning – Free online training courses

Several self paced online training courses are available in this catalogue thanks to MIO-ECSDE.  You just have to sign up for free and choose the courses you wish to do. Catalogue includes various topics such as marine litter,  odour pollution, wetlands, waste management, pollutants, waste water…

More

EU Teacher’s Hub on Climate Change

The Teacher’s Hub contains a selection of classroom exercises and relevant materials for the “Causes”, “Impacts” and “Solutions” modules of the interactive site for students “Our planet, our future”. In each section, you’ll find an introduction worksheet, various thematic worksheets and one answer sheet.

More

Coastal Resilience Education Toolkit

7 activities related to climate change, water, seashore and effects by humans.  Mostly for older students… Activity 1: The Human Impacts Game Activity 2: The Mystery of the Disappearing Shells Activity 3: Become an Ecological Engineer Activity 4: Neighborhood Water Budget Activity 5: Tallying Up Temperature Rise Activity 6: Water Quality Testing at Home Activity 7: Waterfront Field Lab Lesson Plan

More

Our Future with Clean Air

Years: All, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 Duration: 60mins Subjects: Art, Cross Curricular, D&T, English, PSHE, Science 60 minute to 240 minute lesson plans, which can be completed as individual lessons or a series of lessons. While the effects of poor air quality are felt worldwide, the sources are usually local. Every day, air pollution and carbon emissions are produced by our commutes to work, by heating our homes, or through our daily lifestyles. Understanding how we live – and the restrictions we face in those choices – is key to improving air quality. Solutions at a local level can make a big difference.  Through scientific investigation, discussion and a variety of writing activities, we can empower our pupils to create local change in their own lives, those of family and friends, school life and local communities. Engaging young people on these issues is critical – they are future voters! Many young people want to be heard and it is the responsibility of educators to give them a platform to voice their opinion.  The resources contained within this pack are the result of the collective effort of partner organisations across Europe, and the many young people who tried and tested them. These resources aim to empower young people to lead the way towards a clean air and zero carbon future! Curriculum Objectives English Key Stage 2 (Age 7-11) Year 3 and 4 (Age 7-9) Discuss and record ideas. Discuss words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination. Draw and justify inferences with evidence. Year 5 and 6 (Age 9-11) Ask questions to improve their understanding. Assess the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing. Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, considering the impact on the reader. Distinguish between statements of fact and opinion. Draw inferences and justify them with evidence. Identify the audience for and purpose of writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models. Note and develop initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary. Perform their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear. Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors. Propose changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning. Provide reasoned justifications for their views. Punctuate bullet points consistently. Select appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning.   Age 7-11)https://www.sustainablelearning.com/resource/our-future-clean-air?destination=teaching-resources Identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments Record data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs Report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations Take measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate Use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests Year 3 (Age 7-8) Ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquiries to answer them Identify …

More

Our Planet, Our Future

The Teacher’s Hub provided by the European Commission  contains a selection of classroom exercises and relevant materials for the “Causes”, “Impacts” and “Solutions” modules of the interactive site for students “Our planet, our future”. In each section, you’ll find an introduction worksheet, various thematic worksheets and one answer sheet.   Our Planet, Our Future: Fighting Climate Change Together Climate change is one of the most serious challenges facing our world today. Our planet is experiencing significant and accelerated climate change that began over a century ago. This educational tool is developed by the European Commission. It is based on information contained in “Our Planet, Our Future: fighting climate change together”, initially published in 2015 ahead of the Paris climate conference and updated in 2018.

More

Been there together GAME

BEEN THERE TOGETHER is an alternative to mobile games, which pull the player into virtual reality. On the contrary, BTT encourages player’s perception of their surroundings and active participation in society. It helps people… ● create relationships ● train social courage ● leave their virtual bubble ● feel more comfortable in their environment How does it work? Today, more than ever, we need to empower community resilience and group collaboration. Questions and challenges provided by the game point to specific societal issues, stimulate discussion and collaboration. From a fun activity to a tool that allows us to better understand and work with several social problems. LET’S BE THERE TOGETHER and empower communities through collective action!  

More

Multimedia animation “The impact of our food”

This multimedia animation is a card game in which you have to sort foods according to one criteria among three: the carbon footprint (greenhouse gas emissions), the water use or the land use. Using this game, you will be able to compare the environmental footprint of different common foods. At the end of the game, you can download a pdf file containing all the cards in a printable version to play in offline mode.

More

The climate in our hands – Ocean and Cryosphere

The UNESCO Center, ‘Office for Climate Education’ (OCE) has launched “Climate in Our Hands”, a free educational kit for primary and secondary schools addressing the theme ‘Ocean and Cryosphere’. It promotes the use of active pedagogies and interdisciplinarity, enabling students to understand the mechanisms of climate change and its impacts, as well as the importance of Ocean and frozen surfaces in climate regulation and in the development of human societies.

More

My Earth Day Pledge – 22nd April

Attached please found a downloadable pledge form which can be used by anybody.

More

Follow Up SDG 3 – Eating Naughty Cars (Year 3 – Year 4)

Watch this video together with the kids to learn more about the concept of the game. The idea is to remove (eat) those cars that are creating a problem to our health and well-being. Ask the kids to make a dino from a used sock and stand next to a window overlooking a busy road. If you don’t have any windows overlooking busy roads try to log into the live cams network across Malta here.

More

Follow Up SDG 3 – Animals Save the planet! (Year 3 – Year 4)

Watch this video to explain why it is important to use other forms of transport. Some follow up questions: In what way are bicycles better than cars? Is it safe to ride a bicycle on our roads? Can you think of ways to render the bicycle use on our roads safer? Can you look up a picture of a recent bike lane that has been constructed lately in the various road widening exercises across the islands. Make them be on the look-out for signs of bicycle lanes if you venture out for a quick ride.  

More

Understanding Food and Climate Change – An Interactive Guide

Understanding Food and Climate Change: An Interactive Guide explores the links between what we grow, eat, and throw away, and the impact of climate change. But why explore the relationships between food and climate change? Because food is an essential human need and offers the potential for personalizing climate change. Food production depends on natural resources that are linked to climate and weather. Understanding the global food system can help your students comprehend how personal choices about food can impact climate change. By talking about food, we can demonstrate why climate change matters to all of us. The link below leads to an interactive e-book with loads of information and activities. The Center for Ecoliteracy offers a no-cost suite of digital education resources that explore the fundamental relationships between climate change and the food systems that sustain human life. These publications consider the potential for food systems-oriented climate change mitigation and adaptation. The first two resources in the suite are Understanding Food and Climate Change: An Interactive Guide and Understanding Food and Climate Change: A Systems Perspective. Understanding Food and Climate Change: An Interactive Guide incorporates text, video, photography, and an array of interactive experiences to deliver climate science alongside multicultural, interdisciplinary viewpoints. Its aim is to promote awareness and understanding of global climate issues, their intersection with food systems, and promising strategies for addressing climate change. This resource includes suggested activities and connections to both the Next Generation Science Standards and the National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies Thematic Strands. The companion publication, Understanding Food and Climate Change: A Systems Perspective, is a collection of essays that addresses topics that educators will encounter when teaching about food and climate change. These essays offer subjects for class discussion or student research and provide extensive resources for further investigation. This resource applies systems thinking to inspire readers to think in terms of systems, both human and natural. Used together, these publications serve as a strong foundation for developing and deepening our understanding of how we interact with nature. They are valuable resources for anyone engaged in shaping a more positive future. Copyright © 2018 Center for Ecoliteracy 2150 Allston Way, Suite 270 Berkeley, CA 94704-1377

More

Nature for all Discovery Zone

Welcome to the #NatureForAll Discovery Zone. Curated from #NatureForAll partner resources, and ranging from videos to lesson plans, comic books to coloring books, this collection will help you connect people with nature, instill love of nature and learn about nature wherever you are. Refer to the link below for loads of online resources where you can browse hundreds of partner resources, from comic books to lesson plans. and a Conversation Space – A unique online platform allowing you to interact with nature enthusiasts interested in connecting people with nature.

More

Earth School

In response to the COVID-19 crisis, an unprecedented coalition has come together to launch “Earth School,” which provides free, high-quality educational content to help students, parents and teachers around the world who are currently at home. Initiated by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and TED-Ed, Earth School takes students on a 30-day “Adventure” through the natural world. The curated Earth School content features videos, reading materials and activities — which will be translated into 10 languages — to help students gain an understanding of the environment while considering their role within it. This is the biggest online learning initiative in UNEP’s history and is available for free on TED-Ed’s website.

More

Eyes on the Earth – NASA Climate Kids

All about climate change – weather and climate, air, sea, freshwater, carbon, energy, plants and animals and technology and much more.  All in an easy to understand setup and fun way to learn about.  Global climate change made easy and fun to learn about through playing, making, knowing, keeping, watching, dreaming and teaching!!

More

CoReflect – Collaboration and reflection

Project CoReflect (Title: Digital support for Inquiry, Collaboration, and Reflection on Socio-Scientific Debates) is a three year (2008-2011) research program, funded by the European Commission, under the FP7 Science in Society program. Bringing together eight diverse and multi-disciplinary teams from seven European states, the project members promoted evidence-based practice in science teaching and learning, by collaborating to iteratively design, enact, critique, and validate problem-based innovative inquiry learning environments.

More

A different approach to Global Warming across the curriculum

Is Global warming man made or a natural process? CoReflect provides a set of lesson plans which tackle Global warming through a number of subjects, going across language and debate to chemistry, research skills and observation.  The age group is more aimed at secondary school students.  Below are links to the CoReflect website and the lesson plans

More

Consumer Classroom – also in Maltese…

Consumer Classroom is a new collaborative website for teachers about consumer education. It provides free, high quality resources for teachers along with interactive and collaborative tools to help teachers prepare lesson plans to share with students and other teachers from across the EU. Sign Up now on www.ConsumerClassroom.eu

More

From Awareness to Action

Contributed By: Kerry G. Williams, Detroit Public Schools Aimed for teenage students. Students may have a hard time making sense of environmental problems far away as they impact them in their lives. This lesson looks at the impacts of climate change on ecosystems around the world and from a local urban perspective. It asks students to consider their day-to-day habits in the city and what it really means globally to act locally.

More

Written Declaration on Climate Change – Youth Voice in Europe

The need was felt to launch a written declaration to the European Parliament that demands MEPs listen to young people’s views on climate change.

More

Free Climate Change Education eBook

Climate Change Education: A Primer for Zoos and Aquariums, explores the links between climate change science, electronic media, psychology, learning sciences, communication, and interpretation, and provides valuable insights to zoos and aquariums and other cultural institutions.

More

The Earth Dog Story – Earth Dog returns to Save the Environment

The Earth Dog Story, first published in 1992, returns as an app in iTunes and an eBook as part of the U.S. Department of Energy environmental outreach program with Weekly Reader. Earth Dog is a superhero who teaches kids about taking care of the environment.

More

Early Childhood Activities for a Greener Earth

This book by Patty Born Selly, Published by Redleaf Press helps to educate young children about the environment through experience and play. These activities encourage children to develop a sense of wonder, curiosity, and joy for nature.

More

Road to Rio + 20 workbook – Activities and Lesson plans

This publication is designed to introduce young people to the issues that will be central to Rio+20, by first providing you with a useful context of the project (Part 1 -Overview) and then moving forward to what you and the young people you work with can do as part of a classroom or youth group activity (Part2 – Activities & Lessonplans).

More

Explaining Climate Change to Infants

Mr Johann Gatt, EkoSkola Coordinator, developed a session about climate change for the Early Years.  The powerpoint presentation shows step by step how he developed the session by showing them various pictures, short video clips, using a doll sized house and explaining the effects of cars and pollution through the use of a blanket, bubbles and ice cubes…

More

Lesson Plans on Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Energy Works Michigan has just released free downloadable lesson plans on energy efficiency, solar energy, and wind energy.

More

Catch the Wind, Harness the Sun: 22 Super-Charged Science Projects for Kids

This entertaining book gives kids, teachers, and parents 22 exciting activities for using sun and wind power to produce and play with renewable energy. Ages 8 to 13 will enjoy environmental science while fighting global climate change.

More

Project Learning Tree Releases New High School Curriculum

Nine activities in PLT’s Exploring Environmental Issues: Focus on Forests teach students about forest health, watersheds, climate change, who owns America’s forests, and more.

More

What’s on your fork?

Does what you eat really have impact on our planet? Could mealtime choices actually help promote clean drinking water? What’s On Your Fork? is a new, free downloadable action guide and collection of supplementary educational tools from EarthEcho International designed to help educators and students explore the environmental and community impact of daily food choices.

More

Cool the Earth

Cool The Earth is a free, ready-to-run climate change assembly program that educates K-8 students and their families about climate change and inspires them to take simple actions to reduce their carbon emissions. The program is successful because it’s fun and empowering for the kids, and their enthusiasm is contagious!

More

Which Switch? Game – Switch Campaign by OPM

The Office of the Prime Minister provided EkoSkola with giant size ‘snakes and ladders’ canvas games. Instead of the usual ladder there is an energy saving bulb whilst the snake has been replaced by a bolt of lightning indicating an electric shock (for those who are not energy and water conscious!). It has also hints how to use up less electricity and water…

More

Shout about Climate Change / Climate Solutions

Shout about is Friends of the Earth’s annual activity project for 11-13 yr olds who want to get active on environmental issues. Shout About activity packs available.

More

Earth Day Activities and resources

The Educatall team provides a long list of activities, games, ideas for workshops by topic.

More

Climate change and lifestyles guidebook for youths

Loads of information, activity ideas, tips, online resources and case studies about climate change – considering the food we eat, things we buy, transport, energy, third world countries, water, jobs, lifestyle, good life, leisure and entertainment and above all ways to take action.  All this is available in the UNESCO produced downloadable pdf Guidebook.

More

How to Ban Plastic Bags in Your Community – Young Voices on Climate Change

High-school students successfully campaigned to ban plastic bags in their city of Santa Monica. This was one of the first cities that banned plastic bags in the United States. The entire country of China has banned plastic bags

More

Climate Change info pack by WWF

Climate change is considered to be the most serious environmental challenge facing our planet. Our way of life, our wildlife and our environment are threatened. This pack will help you tackle this topical issue in the classroom and explores: What are the impacts of climate change? What is being done to stop climate change? How can we help stop climate change?

More

Earth Day Network

Teach about the history of the environmental movement with Earth Day Network’s newest curriculum unit. This online resource for all ages and users provides lesson plans, activity ideas, and digital multimedia resources for the classroom. http://www.earthday.org

More

NASA Gives Kids Their Own Guide to Climate Change

NASAs new Climate Kids Web site, targeting grades 4-6, de-mystifies global climate change science using simple illustrations, humor, interactivity, and age-appropriate language. The interactive Climate Time Machine shows how global changes affect our planet over time.

More