Biodiversity: Lesson plans/Activities

Learning Corner for 5-18 year olds by European Commission

If you’re a primary or secondary school pupil, this is where you’ll find games, competitions and activity books to help you discover the EU in a fun way, in the classroom or at home. You can also find out more about studying or volunteering abroad. If you’re a teacher and want to help your pupils learn about the EU and how it works, this is a source of teaching material for all age groups. As well as finding inspiration for lesson plans, you can also discover networking opportunities with other schools and teachers across the EU. You can find material about food, farming, fisheries, environment, climate, energy, culture and much more… NOTE:  This resource is available in various languages.  Links to the Maltese and English versions can be found below.   More direct links in attachments below too.

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BEMED Educational Resource Pack – Clean Seas by Eco-Schools Malta

Plastic pollution is one of the greatest environmental disasters affecting the oceans. Once discarded into the natural environment, plastic can take up to 500 years to disappear. Every year, more than 8 million tons of plastic litter is thrown into the ocean. Drifting between waters, it can be ingested and can strangle or suffocate many animal species. Under the effect of the sun, it breaks into fragments called microplastics that can be ingested by fishes and enter the food-chain, which can have lasting impacts on human health.

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BeMED 18. Young journalists in action!

Title Young journalists in action! Author Audrey Gauci Age Guide Year 7-10 Subject Area English Language (but can be adapted to other languages) Preparation Time Preparation of interview / questionnaires to conduct an investigation in a coastal village/town. Estimated Duration 20 mins – reporting skills 20 mins – information session on marine litter 40 mins – discussion and creation of interview questions 40 mins – investigation outside school / online 40 mins – evaluation and reporting of investigation Site Any site related to the theme chosen – preferably a coastal area where marine litter is most prominent. Educational objectives –   Adhere to the requirements of the English syllabus in relation to report writing –   Learn how to investigate, be critical and assess comments and opinions expressed by others –   Express themselves in journalistic-style writing –   Work in teams Report Writing Report writing involves the production of a formal, informative and systematically presented text concerning a situation, person, place or plan. Report writing needs to evidence three clear characteristics: (a) adherence to the original request or brief; (b) a sustained perspective of who the report is supposedly being written by; and (c) an awareness of intended audience. Candidates should be able to: –    Select which type of report to write in response to a question. –    Employ a formal style of writing. –    State the purpose of the report in the introductory paragraph. –    Organise content by means of separate paragraphs clearly marked with subheadings. – Demonstrate an awareness of intended audience. Learning Outcomes Creative learning: –    I can participate in writing for a wide range of purposes and genres. Expressive language: – I can report, both in speech and in writing, what others have said or written. Managing learning – I can edit and revise my own writing. – I can write appropriately for an audience and with a purpose. – I can vary what I write according to the intended reader Learning to know: – I can justify the importance of identifying problems, reflecting critically, thinking creatively and having a wider vision in order to plan for the future and become an effective agent of change. Learning to do: –   I can use the natural, social and built environment that surrounds me, as a context and source of learning. Learning to be: –   I am a critically reflective person and am able to evaluate decisions, choices and actions. Learning to live together: –    I will challenge unsustainable practices across educational systems, including at the institutional level. Link to SDGs SDG 4: Quality education SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Community* SDG 13: Climate Change SDG 14: Life below water* SDG 15: Life on land* *depends on the theme students select Educational resources required Video tutorials on reporting, in particular to report writing: https://www.yre.global/video-tutorials Interview guide: https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/how-conduct-journalistic-interview/ Appendix 18.1 – Optional PowerPoint (Kindly send email on [email protected] if you wish to obtain this Powerpoint) Internet connection Remote preparation Since both investigation and reporting are required, a session on appropriate reporting skills is …

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BeMED 17. Investigating the effects of marine litter on sea water temperature and pH level

Title Investigating the effects of marine litter on sea water temperature and pH level Author Ramona Mercieca Age Guide Year 7-8 Subject Area Geography, Integrated science Preparation Time 1 hour Estimated Duration Data collection 10 mins daily spread over 2 months Site School ground Educational objectives To develop fieldwork skills such as collecting and recording data To learn more about the effects of marine litter Learning Outcomes –     I can justify the importance of identifying problems, reflecting critically, thinking creatively and having a wider vision in order to plan for the future and become an effective agent of change. –     I can use the natural, social and built environment that surrounds me, as a context and source of learning. –     I am motivated to make a positive contribution to other people and their social and natural environment, locally and globally. –     I can reflect upon the consequences of my actions on present and future generations. Link to SDGs SDG 3: Good health and well-being SDG 4: Quality education SDG 11:  Sustainable cities and communities SDG 12:  Responsible consumption and production Educational resources required 2 big glass jars Sea water Plastic litter Digital pH reader Digital thermometer Data logger to measure air temperature, humidity and air pressure GLOBE Observer App to record cloud type and cover (optional) Appendix 17.1 – Data sheets Remote preparation Organize a beach clean-up event. Marine litter collected to be taken at school to be used in investigation. Collect sea water samples in a small jerry can. Planning Considerations Very important to focus on the FACTS, especially when researching and collecting data about the effects of marine litter. For beach clean-up event: ·      Healthy and Safety information (stay in groups, stay away from the sea and cliffs, hazard of roads and weather). ·      Brief outline of day and objectives for the day. Set up the day’s investigation aim and consider hypotheses.  Toilet stops and time for the lunch break. ·      Risk assessment/class list/medication/first aid kits Method Introduction In this activity students will investigate the effects of plastic litter on sea water temperature and sea water pH levels. Two large glass jars are filled with the same amount of sea water. In one of the jars the students put some plastic litter collected during the beach clean-up event done beforehand. The glass jars are to be placed outside exposed to the sun and rain. Development Every day students will take three readings of the sea  water temperature and pH level from  both jars and calculate the mean of the three samples. Moreover, the students will measure the air temperature, humidity and air pressure, describe the general outlook of the weather and observe cloud cover using the GLOBE Observer App (optional). Information collected is filled in the data sheets (Appendix 17.1). Conclusion  Once all data is collected students will present it in a graph and analyze it through mean values of repetitions (pH and temperature) by jar to both treatments (with plastics, without plastics).  The mean values are to be plotted along the …

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BeMED 16. Outdoor Classroom Activity – Beach Fieldwork

Title Outdoor Classroom Activity – Beach Fieldwork Author Ramona Mercieca Age Guide Year 7 Subject Area Geography Preparation Time 1 hour Estimated Duration 4 hours Site Coastal Area Educational objectives To further students’ map reading skills. To develop fieldwork skills such as collecting and recording data. To learn more about their local area and describe how litter make them feel. Learning Outcomes – I can use the basic mapping skills which include a scale, a legend and compass points to plan journeys, latitudes and longitudes to locate places. – I can use appropriate sources to observe and record local weather. – I can justify the importance of identifying problems, reflecting critically, thinking creatively and having a wider vision in order to plan for the future and become an effective agent of change. – I can use the natural, social and built environment that surrounds me, as a context and source of learning. – I am motivated to make a positive contribution to other people and their social and natural environment, locally and globally. – I can reflect upon the consequences of my actions on present and future generations. Link to SDGs SDG 3: Good health and well-being SDG 4: Quality education for all SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production Educational resources required A4 map of beach site x1 (per group) Appendix 16.1 – Group Recording Sheets X5 (per group) Appendix 16.2 – Litter Survey Sheet x1 (per group) Pencils Clipboards Digital cameras Data logger Thermometer Digital pH reader GLOBE Observer App – optional Small container X1 (per group) Remote preparation Teacher needs to prepare the resources as indicated in the previous section. The outdoor classroom activity will be an opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills learned during geography lessons like using a map, observing and recording the weather, locating beach site using the coordinates. Before the outdoor classroom activity the students will do research about marine litter – its sources and effects on the marine environment. Planning Considerations It is very important to focus on the FACTS, especially when researching and collecting data re marine litter. Healthy and Safety information (stay in groups, stay away from the sea and cliffs, hazard of roads and weather). Brief outline of the day and objectives for the day. Set up the day’s investigation aim and consider hypotheses. Toilet stops and time for the lunch break. Risk assessment/class list/medication/first aid kits. Method Activity Outline: Half the day is spent at the beach collecting field data on weather, sea water temperature, sea water pH level and doing a litter survey. Introduction Introduce site and locate it on the map of the Maltese Islands. Briefly introduce the history of the area (fishing and tourism and coastal erosion). The students will be split in groups and each group will select a leader and is given a pack with the group’s recording sheets and a small container. Development Students explore and investigate the beach site by answering the questions on the …

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BeMED 15. Creating a Collage from Plastic Waste to Reduce Plastics in the Marine Environment

Title Creating a Collage from Plastic Waste to Reduce Plastics in the Marine Environment Author Lino Xerri Age Guide Year 7 Subject Area Art Preparation Time Preparation of a large cardboard to support the collage with the students’ works. Estimated Duration 90 minutes Site If lesson is held out of class, the hot glue gun is to be portable and images of marine life are to be projected in a different way instead from an interactive board. Educational objectives Learning to express creatively one’s ideas Learn how to fight against marine pollution by reusing Develop technical skills of plastic sculpture Learning Outcomes – I can investigate, observe and gather data information about my environment. – I can demonstrate and discuss the developments in my work as I gain new techniques, skills and confidence with 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional media. – I can justify the importance of identifying problems, reflecting critically, thinking creatively and having a wider vision in order to plan for the future and become an effective agent of change. – I have a future-oriented perspective for how I live my life as a citizen of the world. Link to SDGs SDG 14: Life below water Educational resources required Plastic bottles, craft knife, permanent marker, hot glue gun, round-edged scissors, paint brushes, palettes, watercolour paints, interactive board. Appendix 15.1 – Sea Creatures Remote preparation Students will research and document by producing sketches and photocopies of marine creatures. Planning Considerations Working with plastic as a medium requires the use of round-edged scissors and a craft knife. Teacher supervision must be constant and the student per teacher ratio must be adequate. Method Introduction Discussion about the importance of keeping the sea clean, especially closed basins like the Mediterranean, is highlighted. The beauty of the sea that surrounds our islands and about the creatures that live in it must be a positive keynote to mention. The teacher shows images of sea creatures (Appendix 15.1) and helps students observe the shapes, lines and colours perceived in the images. Teacher gives a demonstration on how to draw a fish on a plastic bottle using a permanent marker and how to cut it out. Development Students are grouped in teams so that although they work on an individual piece, peer suggestions and help are still considered. They use a permanent marker to draw fish, seahorses, shells, seaweed and other marine creatures on plastic bottles and other plastic items they have brought with them. Using scissoring skills and with the help of the teacher, they cut out the figures they drew using a rounded-edge scissors and craft knife. Students paint the back of the plastic figures using bright watercolours to obtain a translucent effect. They are instructed to observe the shapes, lines and colours of the marine creatures they have researched and documented beforehand in the remote preparation for this lesson. Students affix the figures using hot glue on a pre-prepared cardboard in order that all the student’s creations are displayed as a large collective collage of an …

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BeMED 14. Under-the-water Experience

Title Under-the-water Experience Author Ms Sharon Giordimaina Age Guide Year 6 Subject Area Science and Technology, Education for Sustainable Development Preparation Time 15 minutes Estimated Duration 60 minutes Site Just in case the school would be interested to organize a follow-up activity.  A safe diving-experience site can be found in the respective country or a submarine outing organized for school children. Educational objectives Students will learn about some below-the-water species and plants. – I can investigate and give examples of the adaptations of plants to suit their environment. – I know that the environment is a system which can be harmed. – I know about dangers posed to the environment such pollution and the destruction of marine life. Learning Outcomess – I can identify priorities and evaluate potential consequences of different decisions and actions. –  I can involve myself and others in real-world issues to bring about a positive difference. Link to SDGs SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production. SDG 14: Life below water. Educational resources required Appendix 14.1 – Sea plants and animals templates plastic waste to create an under-the-water scenario. Appendix 14.2 – Handout activity with a list of species to tick the ones found in the sea. Appendix 14.3 – Handout activity – Under the sea short questions. Appendix 14.4 – A list of reflective questions. Appendix 14.5 – Flashcards – Vocabulary related to marine life. Appendix 14.6 – Video links Internet connection Remote preparation Introduction through a video-clip about a diving experience (https://youtu.be/isFBQFhfI_s) or part of it. Setting up a below-the-water scene, using Appendix 14.1. Students could also be invited to draw or colour in these creatures themselves during previous expressive-arts-related activities. Planning Considerations It might be necessary to give some basic information about marine life, marine pollution with a possible link to water pollution. Method Introduction –    Talk briefly about sea life and see what the students know about this ecosystem.  Have they ever learnt about it in detail?  How do they feel when they are at sea or dive shortly under the sea? –    Share a video-clip about undersea creature on earth (https://youtu.be/nvq_lvC1MRY).  Invite students to observe and look closely at life under the sea. –    Introduce some vocabulary related to the sea plants and creatures. –    Discuss how these can be affected by plastic residues thrown on the ground. Development –   Invite students to talk about the under-water scenario they can see, created with the use of Appendix 14.1.  Have they ever experienced an under-water observation?  Are they curious to experience it? –   Distribute the handout with a list of species (Appendix 14.2).  Go through it together.  Then give some ample time for them to look around/think of sea life under water and write what they can see or be found in that habitat.  Refer to the short questions in Appendix 14.3. –   Debate about what is proper and improper in the scenario. –   Speak shortly about the divers’ experiences, how prepared they should be and what they would ask if they were …

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BeMED 12. Persuasive Writing Task

Title Persuasive Writing Task Author Ms. Samantha Abela Age Guide Year 5-11 Subject Area English, Maltese, Geography, Social Studies, ICT, Environmental Studies Preparation Time Nil Estimated Duration 2 hours Site Classroom or computer lab Educational objectives Students understand and are empowered to address the real causes and consequences of unsustainable behaviour within the context of an interdependent and globalised world. Learning Outcomes – I can order ideas and describe them effectively to contribute to discussions supported by the teacher. – I can write for a stated purpose, using grammar and sentence starters. – I can gather information from long and complex articles and books. Link to SDGs SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production SDG 14:  Life below water Educational resources required Interactive Whiteboard Appendix 12.1 – Spider diagram Appendix 12.2 – Writing frame Appendix 12.3 – Capturing your audience Appendix 12.4 – Persuasive writing vocabulary Appendix 12.5 – Writing prompts discussions Appendix 12.6 – Websites to help students with research Internet Connection Remote preparation The ‘Fact-Finding’ Task can be done before the lesson and allot more time to writing and class discussion. The links provided can be sent to the students beforehand. Planning Considerations The lesson can be done in class or in a Computer Lab. In case of a Lab, booking of the facility would be required. The Fact-Finding task can be done as an introduction or as a pre-task before the lesson. Students require some technological device and an internet connection during the lesson for the Fact-Finding task. Students should be warned about the huge amount of information available online. Teachers can opt to: Limit the websites they search by giving them a prescribed list or by limiting the search by geographical zone example: things related to Malta only. Method Introduction 5 minutes – The teacher introduces the topic of ‘Persuasive Writing’. The teacher asks what is the meaning of the word ‘Persuasive’ and can create a spider diagram (Appendix 12.1) on the board jotting down the students’ ideas before giving the following definition: “making you want to do or believe a particular thing” – Definition by Cambridge Dictionary “able, fitted or intended to persuade” “inducement” – Definition by Dictionary.com Development 10 minutes -The teacher moves on to introduce the students to the main activity. The students will act as opinion writers for a local newspaper. They are concerned with the presence of plastic litter in our seas. The task is to: Write a letter addressed to the editor in which they have to: ·       Outline their concern by explaining what it is about. ·       Provide evidence on the concern by quoting events, sources, statistics, etc. ·       Provide arguments about the concern, namely why this is an important issue to be tackled. ·       Provide ideas about possible solutions to the concern. ·       Conclude the letter in a positive manner, hoping that you are acknowledged. The teacher can provide a Writing Frame (Appendix 12.2) to guide the students in their task. 20 minutes – Now that the students know …

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BeMED 10. Posidonia oceanica – litter within and without

Title Posidonia oceanica – litter within and without Author Johann Gatt Age Guide Year 4-8 Subject Area Science, Mathematics, Arts and crafts, Languages, ESD Estimated Duration 2½ hours – an outdoor session on a sandy beach. Site Any sandy beach ideally with visible posedonia banquettes. Also ideally there is a wooden ramp that extends as close as possible to the shoreline to render access to learners using mobility assistive devices. Educational objectives To identify from drawings plant parts of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica and outline the life cycle in simple words. To mention two marine species that live and thrive within the posedonia meadows. To list key benefits of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica. To mention threats leading to the potential loss of posedonia meadows. To discuss solutions that could help protect the existing meadows and prevent further loss of Posidonia oceanica. To propose some possible non-conventional methods to protect the species. Learning Outcomes – I am able to creatively and innovatively take considered action and challenge assumptions underlying unsustainable practice. – I am sensitive to divergent disciplines and perspectives, cultures and minority groups without prejudices and preconceptions. – I can justify the importance of identifying problems, reflecting critically, thinking creatively and having a wider vision in order to plan for the future and become an effective agent of change. – I can reflect upon the consequences of my actions on present and future generations. – I am able to collaborate with other learners and the educators facilitating the session. Link to SDGs SDG 14: Life below water Educational resources required Appendix 10.1 – details of Game a set of printed photos in display file to be used during game and explanation – Appendices 10.2 to 10.9: Appendix 10.2 – Benefits Appendix 10.3 – Distribution Appendix 10.4 – Life Cycle Appendix 10.5 – Parts Appendix 10.6 – Protection Appendix 10.7 – Species living in it Appendix 10.8 – Threats Appendix 10.9 – Uses 2 small dice: one red, one green A cup or non transparent holder for dice Deep tray, dish or flat surface to throw dice on (at the beach) Timer/alarm (optional) Internet Connection for remote preparation Remote preparation For Year 4 – 6 students: Video to be used as a discussion primer in class https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPCgLonKaf0 For Year 7 – 8 Learners: Video  Importance of Posidonia Oceanica as an introductory tool to the outdoor session https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-X8VX_sK1Y Planning Considerations –    Check if ERA/Local Council permits are a pre-requisite before visiting site. –    Clearance from the respective Health and Safety body overseeing outdoor site assessment. –    Pre-visit to the site to check for health hazards or potential threats and basic amenities. –    Re-visiting again a few hours before the activity. –    Look for ideal spots and resources in situ. Ideally many of the resources are to be sourced from the site to avoid carrying a lot of material, but in full respect and senstivity to the site being used. –    Strict adherence to ERA permit at all times to avoid disturbing the site. …

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BeMED 8. A Turtle’s Life

Title A Turtle’s Life Author Esther Sammut Carbone Age Guide Year 2–6 Subject Area Social Studies, Science   Preparation Time Viewing and discussing the 3 video clips (links provided): 45 minutes Optional – Making cardboard turtles or origami: 30 minutes   Estimated Duration 2 hours in total Introduction: 30 minutes; Development: 55 minutes; Conclusion: 30 minutes.   Site On a sandy beach   Educational objectives To understand that marine litter affects wildlife, through the lifecycle of a turtle and the threats it encounters until it reaches maturity and beyond. To understand that marine litter affects us and future generations through its durability, spreading and accumulation in food chains. To raise awareness of the nature and magnitude of the marine litter matters with reference to the dominance of land based sources of marine litter, dominance of plastic among the marine litter items, the top ten items in marine litter, the lifetime of different waste materials especially plastic objects, the micro-plastics issue and sources,  the 5 garbage patches, the spread of litter from source countries. To understand that action is needed by everyone in everyday life to tackle the marine litter matters. To identify some of these actions with emphasis on daily waste minimisation efforts besides wildlife rescues and to encourage to start taking action.   Learning Outcomes – I can recognise the relationship between understanding others and the wellbeing of all in the present and the future. – I can identify the root causes of inequality and injustice and actions that lead to a better quality of life, equity, solidarity and environmental sustainability. – I can use the natural, social and built environment that surrounds me, as a context and source of learning. – I can involve myself and others in real-world issues to bring about a positive difference. – I can reflect upon the consequences of my actions on present and future generations. – I can live in harmony with myself, others and the natural world at a range of levels from the local to the global. – I can identify the root causes of inequality and injustice and actions that lead to a better quality of life, equity, solidarity and environmental sustainability. – I can use the natural, social and built environment that surrounds me, as a context and source of learning. – I can involve myself and others in real-world issues to bring about a positive difference. – I can reflect upon the consequences of my actions on present and future generations. – I can live in harmony with myself, others and the natural world at a range of levels from the local to the global. Yr 2: – Identify practical ways of reducing, reusing, recycling, and repairing waste as well as refusing items and rethinking everyday practices to safeguard planet Earth. – Ask questions about the environment around them. – Work individually and in groups, share and discuss ideas and listen to other ideas Make connections to everyday life situations Yr 3-6: – I can ask questions …

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BeMED 7. Accumulation

Title Accumulation Activity 3 of 3 about plastic pollution Author Saviour Bonnici Age Guide Year 4-8 Subject Area Physical Education Preparation Time 3 minutes Estimated Duration 30 to 45 minutes Site Gym/ Yard / Outdoor space No. of participants Whole class Educational objectives This is a fun physical education activity with the aim of teaching students about micro-plastics and our impact on the sea, fish life and our health. This activity provides a realistic and practical example of how micro-plastic accumulates in the food web. Learning Outcomes – Speed. Agility. Stamina. Quick reactions. – I understand that I am responsible for my actions and am capable of anticipating the problems of consuming plastic and adapt to reduce it. Link to SDGs     SDG 12: Responsible consumption SDG 14: Life below water SDG 15: Life on Land Remote preparation Playing ‘Uncontrollable’ (Lesson plan 5) and ‘Plastic Breakdown’ (Lesson plan 6) before this activity will prepare students for this activity, however this is optional. Equipment needed Three types of coloured bibs ·   6 green bibs ·   4 yellow bibs ·   the rest (according to number of participants) red bibs Internet connection is needed to watch the video links provided in the background information. Method Objective: Catch your food Student Organization: Small Fish (S) – 6 students wearing green bib (or any other colour) Medium Fish (M) – 4 students wearing yellow bib Top Predator Fish (P) – 2 students Fish Food (F) / Plankton – The majority of the remaining students wearing a red bib (FR). It is VERY IMPORTANT to leave only a few without bibs (F).   Playing the Game Part 1: Fish food is eaten by small fish ·       The playing area represents the Ocean ·       The fish food run in the Ocean ·       Instruct the small fish to go and eat (catch) all the fish food. ·       For now, the other fish are waiting. ·       Whenever a fish food is caught, he/she is transported to a designated captured area where they will remain. Everyone keeps a record of how many fish food they captured. Game is paused when all fish food is caught. Part 2: Small fish eaten by Medium fish Medium Fish introduced. Now the small fish will be eaten by the medium fish and transported to the captured area. Part 3: Medium fish eaten by the Top Predator fish Top Predator Fish introduced. Same as part 2 and the game ends here. Part 4: Explanation See Recap section below Recap   The reason for the fish food with the red bib (FR) is now revealed. They are the micro-plastic. The others are the actual fish food (F).  The small fish do not know the difference so when they eat, micro-plastics enter the food web. The higher the food web hierarchy, the more micro-plastic accumulation. Apart from killing marine life, when we humans eat fish especially the top fish, we inevitably also ingest the micro-plastics. Actions students can take: ·       When encountering plastic rubbish, try to …

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BeMED 6. Plastic Breakdown

Title Plastic Breakdown Activity 2 of 3 about plastic pollution Author Saviour Bonnici Age Guide Year 1-8 Subject Area Physical Education Preparation Time 3 minutes Estimated Duration 30 to 45 minutes Site Gym/ Yard / Outdoor space No. of participants Whole class Educational objectives Through this interactive activity students learn how plastic breaks into microplastic. It is important for students to conceptualize the process of plastic breakdown, for them to act against the effects of micro-plastics. Additionally, this is a great activity to work on teamwork and improve their physical abilities mostly by responding to quick stimulus, running and agility. Learning Outcomes – I am able to react to acoustic and visual stimuli through a change in speed while running, and at the same time changing direction quickly and effectively. – I am able to understand that I am responsible for my actions and capable of anticipating the problems of consuming plastic and adapt to reduce it. Link to SDGs     SDG 12: Responsible consumption SDG 14: Life below water SDG 15: Life on Land Remote preparation Playing ‘Uncontrollable’ (lesson plan 5 in this resource pack) before this activity will help students to better conceptualize micro-plastics. But this is optional. Equipment needed 4 Bibs Internet connection is needed to watch the video links provided in the background information. Method Objective:  Students must quickly react to form new groups otherwise they risk being left behind. Part 1: Familiarize With The Game 1)     A class of say 25 students, hold hands – representing a plastic bag floating in the sea, the playing area (Diagram 1). 2)     The teacher calls out a smaller number. Students must quickly form new groups consisting of the mentioned number. This represents the plastic bag disintegrating into smaller pieces.     3)     Smaller numbers are called in sequence, each time forming new groups until eventually the number 1 is called out and students are now single individuals – this is the micro-plastic. The single plastic bag problem has now multiplied into unmanageable micro-plastics. 4)     The teacher explains about the process of plastic breakdown. Check the Recap section below for information. Part 2: Introducing Marine Life 5)     Restart the game. 6)     Same as part 1 but this time 4 students wearing a bib represent marine life. These will be roaming around the playing area (diagram 2). All the other students representing the plastic bag try to catch the marine life.   Rule: A catch is valid if the plastic group has the correct amount of members last called by the teacher. If for some reason the group splits while catching, this does not count. Being large the plastic will not be able to catch marine life at first. The situation turns when there are too many plastic pieces engulfing marine life. Recap   When Part 1 is over the teacher explains about disintegration of plastic. Environmental factors such as the sun and salt, breakdown the plastic bag into very small pieces which are impossible to collect.  The video …

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BeMED 5. Uncontrollable

Title Uncontrollable Activity 1 of 3 about plastic pollution Author Saviour Bonnici Age Guide Year 1-8 Subject Area Physical Education Preparation Time 3 minutes Estimated Duration 30 to 45 minutes Site Gym/ Yard / Outdoor space No. of participants Whole class Educational objectives Students will learn about the negative impacts of using a lot of plastic while engaging in physical activity. Learning while moving, and having fun, greatly improves the long-term memory of the learnt material. Students will understand that less plastic = healthier oceans = healthier fish, Earth and humans. Students will acknowledge that as long as humans continue to use huge amounts of plastic, the waste problem continues to be uncontrollable – it is up to us to reduce the consumption. Students will realise how wind and storms aggravate the plastic pollution in the sea. Learning Outcomes – I am able to throw an implement from a standing and moving position using the correct technique (alternate limbs) and correct grip. – I can identify the root causes of injustice (plastic rubbish) and can take actions that lead to a better quality of life and environmental sustainability. – I understand that I am responsible for my actions and capable of anticipating the problems of consuming plastic and adapt to reduce it. – I can involve myself and others (family and friends) in real-world issues (plastic rubbish) to bring about a positive difference (reduce single-use plastic consumption). – I am now equipped with a future-oriented perspective for how I live my life as a citizen in my country and in the world. Link to SDGs     SDG 12: Responsible consumption SDG 14: Life below water SDG 15: Life on Land Equipment needed The teacher will need to mark the areas (diagram below) by either: 1)     Mark the midline and rubbish bin area with markers or cones. OR 2)     If equipment isn’t available improvise by using either 2 chairs or 2 bottles to mark the midline peripheries. Same goes for the rubbish bin area. The teacher will also need safe throwable material by either using: 1)     Bibs, markers and/or soft balls (at least 10 pieces but the more the better) OR 2)     If this is not available any other plastic material such as plastic bottles, caps & wrapping. Internet connection is needed to watch the video links provided in the background information. Safety Precautions   Use soft objects to throw that do not have a sharp edge – markers and softballs are great. Method Objective:  The team with least amount of plastic before time expires wins the game. Part 1: Introducing Plastic in the Sea The game 1.     Playing area is divided in 2 sections (diagram above) – Beach and Sea. 2.     The Beach is occupied by the Teacher and 2 other students. These are the bad guys. The rest of the students are on the ‘Sea’ area – the good guys. 3.     The bad guys have a few markers/bibs/ or any other type of safe throwable equipment – representing …

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BeMED 4. Oh No! Plastic in my food! Plastic everywhere!

Titles Oh No! Plastic in my food! Plastic everywhere! Author Anita Muscat Age Guide Year 1-3 with adaptations for Year 6 Subject Area English, Science, Fine motor skills when colouring and handling scissors for the younger students. Preparation Time Depends on what activity is chosen and how it is carried out Estimated Duration 30 to 45 minutes Site Classroom and/or school hall / yard Educational objectives Students will learn that all creatures living in the sea are interconnected and that anything which affects one of them will probably affect others further up the chain as well. Students will become aware of what micro-plastics are, where they come from and the harm they cause. Students will learn that our plastic consumption has somewhat spiralled out of control but this trend can be reversed if we all do our part. Students will learn that many countries around the world are aware of the harm caused by plastics and what they are doing to address the problem. Learning Outcomes Year 1 and 2 – Understand that planet Earth supports life and therefore we must take care of Earth’s resources. – Identify practical ways of reducing, reusing, recycling and repairing waste as well as refusing items and rethinking everyday practices to safeguard planet Earth. – I can handle scissors safely to cut freely, along straight and curved lines. Year 3 – I can ask questions about the world around me. – I can carry out a simple practical investigation with the teacher’s support. – I can make simple conclusions from my direct observations. Year 6 – I can access information from a range of sources with ability and efficiency. – I can write for an audience and with a purpose. – I can create and write my own book/s experimenting with different genres. – I can find answers to simple questions on a scientific topic. – I can identify simple cause and effect relationships. – I can explain that the environment is an ecosystem that can be harmed through pollution, destruction of the natural environment, acid rain, overfishing and overpopulation. – I can observe and describe how the sea is becoming polluted and its effect on marine life. Link to SDGs SDG 14: Life below water Educational resources required Posters, pictures, books and videos containing information about the different forms of life in the sea. Appendix 4.1 – Template: How to draw a fish (1) Appendix 4.2 – Template: How to draw a fish (2) Appendix 4.3 – Template: How to draw a fish (3) Appendix 4.4 – Photos: 3D Fish Appendix 4.5 – Poster: Lifecycle of a plastic water bottle Appendix 4.6 – Poster: How long does it take for trash to decompose Appendix 4.7 – Powerpoint: Can we end plastic pollution Appendix 4.8 – Powerpoint: Plastics and the environment Appendix 4.9 – Poster: Food chains Cereal boxes, coloured paper, paper puncher/scissors Internet connection Remote preparation Year 1 – 3 : Prepare various different sized, rectangular pieces of cardboard (used cereal boxes). Sizes …

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BeMed 3. Our Sea

Title Our Sea Author Amanda Pace, Mariella Grech & Melissa Grima Age Guide KG2 Subject Area Music, ICT, Arts & Crafts, Numeracy Skills (Sorting), Knowledge & Understanding of the World Preparation Time Approximately 2 hours (over a period of 2 days in which during this time the students paint the scene and the frame using paint, enhancing interaction and socialisation and colour a Picture of a fish with crayons.) Estimated Duration 60 minutes + a day outing Site School & a preferred sandy beach Educational objectives The aim of this activity is to raise awareness and enhance our students’ knowledge – from an early age – of the beauty of our environment, particularly marine life, what we can do to keep it clean (especially from plastic). During this activity, students will enrich their learning through multisensory approaches, increase their listening and communication skills as well as develop socially. Learning Outcomes Children who have a positive self-image. – I am able to ask questions in order to learn new things.Children who develop positive attitudes which enable them to take the initiative and become risk- takers. – I am motivated to engage with a range of learning opportunities present in my environment. Children are socially adept. Children who learn to collaborate with peers and adults. Children who are effective communicators. Children who are versatile and skilled with knowledge and information as well as meaning making and comprehension. – I sort objects into simple categories. Link to SDGs SDG 14: Life Below Water Educational resources required Sea Animals Colouring Pages (colouring book style pictures of a crab, jelly fish, seaweed, fish, turtle, etc. especially those found locally) such as can be found here: https://www.firstpalette.com/printable/sea-animals.html , https://www.pngwing.com/en/free-png-nwnxw, https://www.vecteezy.com/vector-art/127843-free-sea-creatures-vectors Video clips on You Tube: A whale’s tale: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgLa7bPB6DA Animals in the Ocean Action Song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGz176Oz4TY Save the Sea Animals: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogtvFbBfPEA Sea Life Frame and Scene (as in photos): paint, large cardboard box, glue, googly eyes, recycled foam, scissors and wall nut shells. Trash Items for Recycling Trash Game Internet connection Remote preparation Learners are asked about the sea creatures and how we should take care of them when they have to draw them in preparation for this activity. The teacher will also explain what she intends to carry out when painting the scene, the frame and the sea creatures so that they know the reason why they are going to take part in this activity that is: to save our seas. Planning Considerations Student misconceptions: Learners may think that ALL sea creatures are being killed because of plastic pollution, however the teacher must explain that we should learn how to reduce plastic waste and recycle it so that we protect sea life from further harm. Safety Precautions: During the sorting activity the teacher must be very careful so that children would not hurt themselves with any sharp materials or glass that they can break easily. Tips: When painting the scene, it is best if it is done in the yard so that children have enough …

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18+1 IDEAS FOR ACTIVITIES WITH STUDENTS ON PLASTIC WASTE

This new educational material for students (in English and Greek) promotes the minimisation of single use plastics and the proper recycling in our lives. The material is produced in the framework of the MEdIES project “Plastic waste? Into the blue bin, away from the blue sea”,  and is designed to be used by students aged 10-12 years old. It aims to raise awareness on the state and impact of marine litter, especially single-use plastics, as well as on proper recycling, and to motivate a behaviour shift at a household, school and community level. The material comes to support the educational interventions of MEdIES in schools (designed for late primary & early secondary level) but it can be used autonomously by schools/teachers working on these issues. It is a 48-page long publication available in PDF. Download the material in the English language from here

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Coastal Resilience Education Toolkit

7 activities related to climate change, water, seashore and effects by humans.  Mostly for older students… Activity 1: The Human Impacts Game Activity 2: The Mystery of the Disappearing Shells Activity 3: Become an Ecological Engineer Activity 4: Neighborhood Water Budget Activity 5: Tallying Up Temperature Rise Activity 6: Water Quality Testing at Home Activity 7: Waterfront Field Lab Lesson Plan

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Outdoor Learning Pack

Take learning outside with this great resource… Learning doesn’t just take place inside, so why not be inspired by this fantastic and comprehensive pack from the Woodland Trust for Scotland, and use the great outdoors as a key teaching tool? Bursting with tips, tools, case studies and lesson plans, this valuable resource contains all sorts of useful ideas for outdoor learning. However, the type of learning described is something quite different from ‘outdoor pursuits’: it’s all about taking your normal everyday curriculum, and teaching it outside. From Wild Art to Word Art, with plenty of Science, English and Maths in there too, these materials will help you get started with learning in the natural environment! Thanks to Woodland Trust Scotland.

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DING DONG – Ready for the Green challenge

As a teacher, you are always looking for new, engaging content to teach. Here is the Ding Dong challenge toolkit, including sustainability tips. Download yours in your language and start the Ding Dong challenge with your pupils: English (EN) български (BG) čeština (CS) dansk (DA) Deutsch (DE) español (ES) eesti (ET) suomi (FI) français (FR) Gaeilge (GA) ελληνικά (EL) hrvatski (HR) magyar (HU) italiano (IT) latviešu (LV) lietuvių (LT) Malti (MT) Nederlands (NL) polski (PL) português (PT) română (RO) svenska (SV) slovenčina(SK) slovenščina (SL)   Resources and materials

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Multimedia animation “The impact of our food”

This multimedia animation is a card game in which you have to sort foods according to one criteria among three: the carbon footprint (greenhouse gas emissions), the water use or the land use. Using this game, you will be able to compare the environmental footprint of different common foods. At the end of the game, you can download a pdf file containing all the cards in a printable version to play in offline mode.

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The climate in our hands – Ocean and Cryosphere

The UNESCO Center, ‘Office for Climate Education’ (OCE) has launched “Climate in Our Hands”, a free educational kit for primary and secondary schools addressing the theme ‘Ocean and Cryosphere’. It promotes the use of active pedagogies and interdisciplinarity, enabling students to understand the mechanisms of climate change and its impacts, as well as the importance of Ocean and frozen surfaces in climate regulation and in the development of human societies.

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Make seed paper… paper that grows!

When is a recycled product better than the original? When it’s paper that turns into flowers. Here is a good way to recycle used paper and make a beautiful greeting card for someone special. Make your own artsy paper that has wildflower seeds in it! Use colored markers to paint a design or message on it. Give it to someone special to plant in a pot or in the ground. Keep it wet and warm, and it will “recycle” into something far better than old, used paper. What you need: Used printer paper, cross-cut into tiny pieces by a paper shredder. Use 1-1/2 cups for each card. Large bowl of warm water Window screen material Small embroidery hoop Food coloring (optional) Blender 9 x 13-inch baking pan Packet of wildflower or other seeds Bath towels or several layers of felt squares Waxed paper Colored markers What to do: Soak the paper pieces in the bowl of water overnight. Put the soaked paper into the blender, then fill the blender halfway with fresh water. Blend until the mixture is soupy. Add food coloring, if desired, and blend some more. Fill the baking pan one-quarter full of water, then pour in the blended paper mixture—or pulp. Slip the embroidery hoop with screen in from the side so that it slides beneath the pulp and seeds. If necessary, spoon some of the pulp over the screen. Lift the screen gently, catching the pulp mixture evenly on top and letting the water drain off. Lay the screen on a bath towel or felt layers to drain. Sprinkle some seeds on top of the wet pulp, and gently pat them into the surface of the pulp. When the bath towel or felt has soaked up as much water as it can, pick up the hoop and turn it over onto a sheet of waxed paper to dry. (Seeds will be on the bottom.) You may have to gently hit the hoop on the table or counter surface to loosen the pulp from the screen. If the pulp does not stick together, try putting more pulp on the screen next time. Let the paper dry for at least 24 hours. If the paper does not lie flat, place a heavy object (like a book) on it for a few hours to flatten it. Decorate it with markers on the un-seeded side. To plant the paper: When you plant the paper, lay it on the surface of the soil and sprinkle about one-quarter-inch thick layer of soil on top. Water the soil lightly and keep the seeds wet until they sprout and have a few days to grow roots. Good luck and happy recycling!

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Understanding Food and Climate Change – An Interactive Guide

Understanding Food and Climate Change: An Interactive Guide explores the links between what we grow, eat, and throw away, and the impact of climate change. But why explore the relationships between food and climate change? Because food is an essential human need and offers the potential for personalizing climate change. Food production depends on natural resources that are linked to climate and weather. Understanding the global food system can help your students comprehend how personal choices about food can impact climate change. By talking about food, we can demonstrate why climate change matters to all of us. The link below leads to an interactive e-book with loads of information and activities. The Center for Ecoliteracy offers a no-cost suite of digital education resources that explore the fundamental relationships between climate change and the food systems that sustain human life. These publications consider the potential for food systems-oriented climate change mitigation and adaptation. The first two resources in the suite are Understanding Food and Climate Change: An Interactive Guide and Understanding Food and Climate Change: A Systems Perspective. Understanding Food and Climate Change: An Interactive Guide incorporates text, video, photography, and an array of interactive experiences to deliver climate science alongside multicultural, interdisciplinary viewpoints. Its aim is to promote awareness and understanding of global climate issues, their intersection with food systems, and promising strategies for addressing climate change. This resource includes suggested activities and connections to both the Next Generation Science Standards and the National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies Thematic Strands. The companion publication, Understanding Food and Climate Change: A Systems Perspective, is a collection of essays that addresses topics that educators will encounter when teaching about food and climate change. These essays offer subjects for class discussion or student research and provide extensive resources for further investigation. This resource applies systems thinking to inspire readers to think in terms of systems, both human and natural. Used together, these publications serve as a strong foundation for developing and deepening our understanding of how we interact with nature. They are valuable resources for anyone engaged in shaping a more positive future. Copyright © 2018 Center for Ecoliteracy 2150 Allston Way, Suite 270 Berkeley, CA 94704-1377

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Nature for all Discovery Zone

Welcome to the #NatureForAll Discovery Zone. Curated from #NatureForAll partner resources, and ranging from videos to lesson plans, comic books to coloring books, this collection will help you connect people with nature, instill love of nature and learn about nature wherever you are. Refer to the link below for loads of online resources where you can browse hundreds of partner resources, from comic books to lesson plans. and a Conversation Space – A unique online platform allowing you to interact with nature enthusiasts interested in connecting people with nature.

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Earth School

In response to the COVID-19 crisis, an unprecedented coalition has come together to launch “Earth School,” which provides free, high-quality educational content to help students, parents and teachers around the world who are currently at home. Initiated by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and TED-Ed, Earth School takes students on a 30-day “Adventure” through the natural world. The curated Earth School content features videos, reading materials and activities — which will be translated into 10 languages — to help students gain an understanding of the environment while considering their role within it. This is the biggest online learning initiative in UNEP’s history and is available for free on TED-Ed’s website.

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Eco-Gozo Resources

Various resources for schools available here

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Eyes on the Earth – NASA Climate Kids

All about climate change – weather and climate, air, sea, freshwater, carbon, energy, plants and animals and technology and much more.  All in an easy to understand setup and fun way to learn about.  Global climate change made easy and fun to learn about through playing, making, knowing, keeping, watching, dreaming and teaching!!

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It’s Time to Help! – Joint effort between Eco-Schools to produce resources

The major stimulus to launch the project „It´s Time to Help” (ITTH) was the idea of international cooperation among European schools involved in Eco-School Programme. All these schools have realized the methodology concept of “Seven Steps of Eco-School”; however, each Eco-School under the conditions of their country and their climate regions.

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52 Tips for Biodiversity

Biodiversity – the variety of life on Earth – makes our planet habitable and beautiful. Many of us look to the natural environment for pleasure, inspiration or recreation. We also depend on it for food, energy, raw materials, air and water – the elements that make life as we know it possible and drive our economies.

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Fun and Games in Nature – LEAF website link

Through this link you will be lead to our sister website www.leafmalta.org and the resource section aimed at enjoying the outdoors.

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Protecting our native forests/woodland – LEAF

Through this link you will be lead to our sister website www.leafmalta.org and the resource section aimed at Protecting our native forests/woodland.

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Planting More Trees – LEAF

Through this link you will be lead to our sister website www.leafmalta.org and the resource section aimed at Planting More Trees

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Making Responsible Choices – LEAF

Through this link you will be lead to our sister website www.leafmalta.org and the resource section aimed at Making Responsible Choices

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Instilling love for trees – LEAF

Through this link you will be lead to our sister website www.leafmalta.org and the resource section aimed at instilling love for trees.

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CoReflect – Collaboration and reflection

Project CoReflect (Title: Digital support for Inquiry, Collaboration, and Reflection on Socio-Scientific Debates) is a three year (2008-2011) research program, funded by the European Commission, under the FP7 Science in Society program. Bringing together eight diverse and multi-disciplinary teams from seven European states, the project members promoted evidence-based practice in science teaching and learning, by collaborating to iteratively design, enact, critique, and validate problem-based innovative inquiry learning environments.

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The Bee World Project

The BeeWorld Project promotes the understanding and value of bees in schools. By connecting schools worldwide, the program encourages schools and communities to share their learning experiences of these fascinating creatures and what they are doing to help.

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LEAF Newsletter 2

The local LEAF newsletter gives updates about activities organised by Learning about Forests Malta, information about trees and other biodiversity issues, contacts and points to ponder…

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LEAF Newsletter 1

The local LEAF newsletter gives updates about activities organised by Learning about Forests Malta, information about trees and other biodiversity issues, contacts and points to ponder…

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EkoSkola f’Tagħna t-Tfal – Frar 2014

Din il-ħarġa tippreżenta storja ħelwa li tispjega l-importanza ta’ kull ħaġa ħajja fis-sistema biex iżżomm bilanċ.  Anke jekk jonqos speċi wieħed ta’ insett jaf jaffetwa l-ikbar annimal u l-ammont ta’ pjanti fin-natura u jħawwad il-proċess naturali kollu.

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Where food comes from – Bucket farming

Farm to Table In this lesson, students explore the concepts of sustainability and systems thinking while considering the question of where their food comes from. As students construct their own self-watering container system to grow edible plants, they continuously address issues related to systems thinking while participating in food production. They weigh the importance of biodiversity and, after harvest, reflect on mistakes made and recommendations for future bucket farmers.

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Students learning about forests… LEAF

During the November 2013 FEE programmes seminar, primary school students attended a workshop about trees tailor-made by Mr Johann Gatt, National LEAF (Learning About Forests) Programme Coordinator

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The Enviromental Effects of Smoking

What are cigarettes made up from?… Air pollution from cigarette smoke… Cigarette related littering… Tobacco hurts people and their environment… Cigarette filters – silent killers… want to learn more?  Download the PDF document given below.  You will find more information and links about the topic.

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The Ugly Journey of Trash

This is a poster which depicts in one page what happens to trash, where it goes and how it effects the sea and life within and around.  A really sad story… This poster is part of the campaign Project Aware. Click here to download the poster of The Ugly Journey of Trash in PDF format.  

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The Earth Dog Story – Earth Dog returns to Save the Environment

The Earth Dog Story, first published in 1992, returns as an app in iTunes and an eBook as part of the U.S. Department of Energy environmental outreach program with Weekly Reader. Earth Dog is a superhero who teaches kids about taking care of the environment.

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Early Childhood Activities for a Greener Earth

This book by Patty Born Selly, Published by Redleaf Press helps to educate young children about the environment through experience and play. These activities encourage children to develop a sense of wonder, curiosity, and joy for nature.

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Road to Rio + 20 workbook – Activities and Lesson plans

This publication is designed to introduce young people to the issues that will be central to Rio+20, by first providing you with a useful context of the project (Part 1 -Overview) and then moving forward to what you and the young people you work with can do as part of a classroom or youth group activity (Part2 – Activities & Lessonplans).

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EkoSkola f’Tagħna t-Tfal – Marzu 2012

Some school committees and other people take up the initiative to plant trees but unfortunately others steal, uproot trees or vandalise these trees.  What can be done? Xi kumitati ta’ studenti fi skejjel u nies oħrajn, jieħdu inizzjattivi biex iħawwlu siġar imma hawn oħrajn li jisirqu, jaqilgħu jew jivvandalizzaw dawn is-siġar.  X’jista’ jsir?

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Virtual Pond Dip

The Virtual Pond Dip introduces some common organisms and encourages an exploration of the incredible ‘world within a world’ of a real pond. Click on each organism to read the factfile that links to more detail.  

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Project Learning Tree Releases New High School Curriculum

Nine activities in PLT’s Exploring Environmental Issues: Focus on Forests teach students about forest health, watersheds, climate change, who owns America’s forests, and more.

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Schoolyard Biodiversity Guide

The Schoolyard Biodiversity Investigation provides students with the opportunity to learn about biodiversity in a tangible and available environment – their own schoolyard.

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Nature Trust Outdoor programmes

Nature Trust (Malta) believes that establishing a link with nature at an early age is the first step towards a further in-depth experiences and critical approach to our surroundings, its biodiversity and all the environmental issues we face on a local and global level.

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Wied Ghollieqa outing

Wied Għollieqa is a good example of a restored habitat. Since 1990, the site managers, Nature Trust (Malta), have strived to convert a number of abandoned fields into typical local habitats.

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Hands on Farming – Gozo

The Hands On Farming Program is intended to familiarise students with our local environment and with the Maltese farming industry. Students attend the Xewkija Experimental Farm for a half day visit, during which they are given information on the work carried out on the farm.

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Biodiversity for Kids – Teacher’s Guide

This resource is an initiative of the NSW Biodiversity Strategy and has been developed by NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service in collaboration with the Department of Education and Training. This resource book contains lesson plans, students’ worksheets, student fact sheets and teacher’s notes on the following topics: Introducing the term biodiversity Web of life Habitats and homes Aussie ecosystems (since this resource book is made in Australia) Helpful habitats Vertebrate survey Food chains and webs Biodiversity and comparison Improving biodiversity in school grounds  

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Learning about trees

These activities will help you teach children how to appreciate and understand the natural world around them. Chances are you’ll also have fun watching  the children’s face light up with wonderment and curiosity. From the project learning tree:  www.plt.org

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Armenia Tree project

The new edition of the Armenia Tree Project’s (ATP) Plant an Idea, Plant a Tree manual outlines lessons to understand environmental issues and identify practical solutions. The manual was introduced in 2005 when ATP published Armenia’s first teacher’s manual for environmental education, compiled and written by Dr. Karla Wesley. (http://www.armeniatree.org/whatwedo/eea.htm) ATP is developing environmental education as a core program area in order to prepare the nation’s youth for becoming the next generation of environmental stewards. By actively engaging youth in a process to better understand and appreciate the value of a healthy and sustainable environment, ATP seeks to protect the trees we plant today from future exploitation. AS you leaf through the curriculum you will find various related lessonplans for all age levels.  

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The Great Turtle Race

Help the great turtle travel a long journey by guiding it to avoid obstacles such as plastic bags and look for jellyfish.  It is a seven day long race… Thanks to National Geographic.

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PollinatorLIVE: A Distance Learning Adventure

While pollinators may come in small sizes, they play a large and often undervalued role in the production of the food we eat, the health of flowering plants, and the future of wildlife. A decline in the numbers and health of pollinators over the last several years poses a significant threat to the integrity of biodiversity, to global food webs, and to human health. PollinatorLIVE: A Distance Learning Adventure will provide a series of live interactive Web casts, Web seminars, and satellite field trips about pollinators, gardening, and conservation. All resources are free and geared toward grades 4–8.  

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